Play Fantasy The Most Award Winning Fantasy game with real time scoring, top expert analysis, custom settings, and more. Play Now
 
Tag:Heisman Trophy
Posted on: August 29, 2011 5:40 pm
Edited on: September 2, 2011 1:42 pm
 

PODCAST: Previewing the 2011 Heisman race

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

We all know that Andrew Luck is the presumptive Heisman Trophy frontrunner ... but according to our Adam Aizer and Chip Patterson, just because Luck's the frontrunner doesn't mean he's actually in line for the prize.

Who is? A Big 12 wideout? An SEC running back? A "sleeper" candidate? Or is there a quarterback who might be able to outshine even Luck's supernova?

Listen below, download the mp3, or open our popout player to continue browsing. You can also subscribe to the College Football Podcast on iTunes. Enjoy:






Posted on: August 1, 2011 12:38 pm
Edited on: August 1, 2011 12:39 pm
 

Northwestern making its Persa push

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Chicago is somewhat of an odd town as far as college football is concerned. Having lived here just about my entire life, I've noticed that while there are plenty of college football fans, most of them root for schools that aren't in the area. Notre Dame gets a lot of love here, as do Big Ten schools, but the Big Ten schools are places like Michigan, Ohio State, Wisconsin and Illinois.

Meanwhile, Northwestern, which is located just a few miles north of the city's borders, doesn't get that much attention. Something the school has tried to change in recent years with Pat Fitzgerald and the school's most recent "Chicago's Big Ten football team" ad campaign. Well it seems that Northwestern is taking another step in trying to get more eyes in Chicago on the local school.

Beginning next week on the city's Kennedy Expressway, millions of Chicagoans stuck in traffic will be staring at a billboard of quarterback Dan Persa as the school makes a Heisman push for him. It's actually one of two billboards the school is putting up, as another is planned to go up in Bristol, Connecticut. Home of a certain network.

Of course, while Persa is a good quarterback and was having a very good season for Northwestern in 2010 before he injured his achilles, I'm not sure Northwestern thinks he can actually win the Heisman barring some type of transcendent season in which the Wildcats wind up in the Rose Bowl again. I have to feel that the Chicago billboard is just another way of the school saying "Hey, Chicago, we're here you know."
Posted on: July 27, 2011 8:45 am
 

The real story behind Andrew Luck's beard

Posted by Bryan Fischer
If there was one player who received more than his fair share of attention at the Los Angeles stop of Pac-12 Media Days, it was Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck.

Of course he is coming off one of the best seasons in conference history and has been tabbed my many as the Heisman front-runner. But that wasn't the reason everybody was staring abnormally at the humble signal-caller.

It was his Brian Wilson-esque beard.

"I honestly haven't thought past tomorrow about what to do with it. I never had a beard," Luck said. "I'm hesitant to call it a beard. I don't think it's quite there yet. I don't know. I'd never done it before, so why not try. We'll see if it lasts. When I get annoyed of it, I'll shave it."

Luck has stated numerous times that one of the reasons he didn't declare for the NFL draft and decided to return to Palo Alto was the fact that he enjoyed life as a student. As it turns out, the academic side of things was exactly how the beard got started.

"I got lazy after finals," he said. "I didn't shave and my mom didn't say anything to me when I got home.

"I figured, why not try it? I don't have to be presentable in college. That's a rule, right?"

(Everybody who has ever rolled out of bed for an 8 AM class is slowly nodding their heads right now.)

As if being the talk of Twitter Tuesday wasn't enough, it seems as though Luck's facial hair has already inspired Stanford fans to emulate their fearless gridiron leader. Cardinal blog Rule of Tree released an unofficial Andrew Luck "Hirsute of Victory" Cut-Out Beard shortly after his appearance and it wouldn't be all too surprising to see a few fans sporting the real thing once the opener rolls around at Stanford Stadium.

Let's just hope, as head coach David Shaw did Tuesday, that Luck's chinstrap fits over that thing.
Posted on: July 26, 2011 10:17 pm
Edited on: July 26, 2011 11:21 pm
 

Media Day Tidbits: Pac-12 North

Posted by Bryan Fischer

LOS ANGELES -- Following a video production that would have made Steven Spielberg proud, Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott kicked off the conference's inaugural Pac-12 Media Days from Los Angeles Tuesday morning. Though he didn't make bold proclamations about the state of NCAA affairs like some of his peers, Scott did extoll the virtues of the league on the heels of landing a big new media deal.

"The last 12 months have brought monumental change to the Pac 10 conference, now the Pac 12," Scott said. "The conference moniker, Conference of Champions, has been well earned and embraced over the years. And this past year was no exception.

"This is a new era for the conference as we embrace the future, and the addition of Colorado and Utah very much helped us secure a landmark media agreement that's going to provide for unprecedented exposure nationally for the conference.

Scott focused on the accomplishments of the conference both on and off the field, noting that two players were finalists for the William Campbell Trophy, the so-called "academic Heisman." Of course, he also mentioned the fact that the league put two teams in BCS bowls and is returning two returning Heisman finalists.

"The Pac 12 brand of football, if I can describe it that way, is as dynamic as any in college sports. Year after year we seem to produce the best quarterbacks and the most sophisticated offenses in the country," Scott said. "All five of the quarterbacks that are here with us today uphold the standard of play that legends before them set."

Plenty of coaches and players also talked about their teams heading into the league's first year, here's some highlights from Pac-12 North:

Cal:

- "This is always a favorite time of the year because the players have been working hard all summer long and now it's timed to get back to work," head coach Jeff Tedford said. "The chemistry, I'm really excited about this team with the leadership, the work ethic, the team chemistry. I'm really pleased with how they've come together and their work ethic. Very eager to compete."

- The Bears failed to go to a bowl last year but, according to Tedford, they were a handful of plays away.

"Last season we fell short of that, and we're not hiding from that," he said. "We understand that there is a very fine line between winning and losing, and we're six points away from being 8-4 last year."

- Tedford said he will be more involved with play calling this season as a result, hoping to improve a Cal offense that floundered down the stretch last season.

"Offensively we need to improve. We were not close to the consistency that we needed to compete at a high level," Tedford said. "Zach Maynard has been named the started and he earned it."

- With the departure of the team's leading rusher Shane Vereen, Tedford is counting on one of his incoming freshmen to compliment his inexperienced returnees at the tailback position.

"We recruited four tailbacks and I'm excited to see what they can do," he said. "I really think we'll have one back or two be solid contributors."

- Tedford said it would be a little bit different playing two Thursday games and one on Friday. The Bears are also playing the majority of their "home" games at AT&T Park due to construction on Memorial Stadium.

"Wherever those lines are, that's what were going to focus on," he said.

- The 10th year head coach was also asked about Will Lyles since the program purchased a scouting package from the now infamous high school scout.

"I'm not concerned one bit," Tedford said. "I wouldn't know Will Lyles if he were in this room."

Oregon

- Ducks head coach Chip Kelly knew right away the questions about the program's NCAA investigation were coming early and coming often.

"I know the one everybody is waiting to have answered but we sent out a release earlier," Kelly opened his remarks to the media with. "We've cooperated fully with (the NCAA) and will continue to cooperate them."

For more on Chip Kelly's comments on the Lyles situation, click here.

- Kelly's appearance wasn't completely about the cloud hanging over his program. Fresh off a BCS National Championship game appearance, the Ducks head coach is experiencing quite the roster turnover and focused on other issues.

"I looked at our roster coming in here and I think we have 11 or 12 seniors, and we'll have 47 either freshmen or red shirted freshmen," he said. "It's a good time for us. We're excited. We start on August 8, and we have an interesting game to start the season on September 3rd that has every one of our players attention, and we'll work as hard as we can to prepare for that game on September 3rd against a really, really good LSU team."

- Luckily for Oregon's explosive offense, the Ducks aren't hurting for talent despite being young.

"LaMichael (James) is the returning Doak Walker Award winner as the nation's number one running back," Kelly said. "I've always believed that to win football games you have to be able to run the football. And we've led the Pac-10 in rushing in the last four years. Total offense the last four years, scoring offense the last four years, and LaMichael's a huge part of that."

- Kelly said he hasn't made any decisions on suspended players Kiko Alonso and Cliff Harris. Both players are working out with the team but their status for opener and beyond is still up in the air.

- Incoming recruit D'Anthony Thomas, "Can flat out run," according to Kelly and the coaching staff will figure out a way to incorporate him into the offense. Lache Seastrunk is one of the players that's a possibility to be the third string running back behind James and Kenjon Barner but nothing is set in stone because no one grabbed hold of the position in spring practice.

Oregon State

- "We're excited to be here at the dawning of the Pac-12 conference," veteran coach Mike Riley said. "But we're going to really, really have to grow a lot through fall camp and through our season. We had five guys that had off-season surgeries and missed spring practice. So as we get back into this thing, we'll have to grow a lot and be ready to compete all the way down the stretch, get better every day."

- As someone who has just about seen it all over the years, the new format with two divisions and not playing everybody every year will take a bit of getting used to for Riley but he was excited about the changes.

"I've been in the conference a long time now, 11 years, and I've seen the competition rise to where every week is like the Super Bowl," he said. "So I think it's going to be really, really competitive."

- The Pac-12 put on a seminar with their head of officiating on Monday in order to better educate the media about some of the new rules going into effect in 2011. The one rule that has drawn the most criticism is the new celebration rule, which Riley says is just something the players will have to adjust to.

"It's going to be an emphasis for the officials early," he said. "Whether or not you agree with the rules, this is what it is. I think it's going to be to a point where you're going to have to be really careful."

"You've got to deal with it," senior safety Lance Mitchell said. "When it affects the team, it's just bad all around and you have to keep it under control."

- One of the key players for the Beavers is all-everything athlete James Rodgers, who is coming off his second knee surgery but should be able to contribute this season.

"The one thing you can never do with James is count him out," Riley said. "He's been deemed ahead of schedule but I'm going to play this conservatively."

- Rodgers' brother, Jacquizz, was the team's leading rusher for the past few years but left early for the NFL, a decision Riley said was a good one despite the criticism "Quizz" took. Though there's some talent at the position to replace him in the offense, it will be a wait and see approach until one player separates from the pack.

"We don't have a number one back that can replace Quizz today," he said "I think if we look at that group it will probably be running back by committee."

- Riley expects the team to be very solid on defense and expects Jordan Poyer and Michael Doctor to be key contributors among others.
He also said key contributor Joe Halahuni will be ready going into the fall camp after having surgery in April.

Stanford:

- So what's David Shaw's deal? Apparently, it's much like Jim Harbaugh's, the man he replaced in Palo Alto.

"The differences are minimal because our biggest differences are we have different personalities," Shaw said. "We have the same goals and same competitive drive. We like to teach. I see myself as a teacher and that's the environment we've created down there."

- For Shaw's Heisman Trophy front-running quarterback Andrew Luck, not having much a transition between the two head coaches has been invaluable.

"It's definitely nice not to have to learn a new scheme, a new offense," Luck said. "Coach Shaw recruited me. He's been instrumental in my growth as a football player and ever since I've been on campus.  So continuity was definitely something that a lot of the players were hoping for when the coaching change was being made. It's definitely been easier for me, I think.

- Luck was sporting a rather large beard for his media day appearance and according to him, the first time he's grown one. Though he's not sure if he's keeping it, the humble star did make news by announcing that he would indeed be leaving Stanford after this season.

"I'm viewing this as my last college football season and approaching it as such," he said.

- On the opposite side of the ball for The Cardinal, Shaw will be using to co-coordinators on defense with Derek Mason and Jason Tarver.

"We do have co-coordiators," Shaw said. "The mix of those two guys are phenomenal. They're like an old married couple, they finish each others' sentences."

- Wide receiver and ace return man Chris Owusu missed six games due to injury last year and will be a key part of the offense this year with an inexperienced group of receivers - if he can stay healthy.

"I haven't said anything to Chris except play every game," Shaw said. "We need Chris Owusu to play every game. We've got a talented but inexperienced receiving core around Andrew."

Washington

- If there was one person in the room who was really excited to be a part of the inaugural Pac-12 Media Day, it was Washington coach Steve Sarkisian.

"Being a Southern California guy and being raised in this thing when it went from Pac-8 to Pac-10, to Pac-12, it's just exciting," Sarkisian said. "I think for us as the University of Washington and our program as we're growing, we couldn't be in a better conference at you a better time for the exposure needed for us and for this conference."

- Sarkisian talked at length about the Huskies' brand of football as the team moves on from the Jake Locker era.

"I think we've got a football team that you saw at the end of last season starting to play a brand of football that we believe in, that is one that is physical that believes in running the football and playing sound defense," Sarkisian said. "We're fortunate to have veteran leadership as we grow but we're still a very young football team. We've played 16 true freshmen last fall. And we've got veteran leaders."

- There's not much that can get a head coach going than talking about his quarterback and the former signal-caller-turned-coach had no problems praising starter Keith Price but cautioning that they would take it slow in his first year as the starter.

"He's a kid that comes to work with a smile on his face," Sarkisian said. "But the reality of it is we're not going to be able to rely on that quarterback position like we were able to with Jake for two years. It's going to be more on relying on Chris (Polk), and Jesse Callier of running the ball, then utilizing the one-on-one matchups on the outside with the Jermaine Kearse, Devin Aguilar, Kevin Smith, and maybe the emergence of a newcomer in Kasen Williams.

- With someone new behind center, many expect Polk to carry the offense on his back, something he accepts but realizes he can't really do if the team is to be successful.

"It's not necessarily on my back, because the game of football is not based off individual performances," Polk said. "So if our O-line's not working and the running game's not working and the passing game's not working."

- A few players, such as Semisi Tokolahi and Sione Potaoa'e, might be limited once the Huskies break for fall camp but the team should be close to full strength once the pad comes on.

"For the most part we're healthy," Sarkisian said. "We look good. Our guys are transforming their bodies and look great."

Washington State

- Washington State was picked last in the North Division but if there is one encouraging sign for the Cougars, it's on defense with some players who are young but have starting experience.

"There's a good chance that we'll start just one or two seniors on defense," head coach Paul Wulff said. "I'm pretty sure we're going to take a big step on defense."

- Wulff signaled out running back Rickey Galvin, wide receiver Kristoff Williams and linebackers Sekope Kaufusi and Alex Hoffman-Ellis as players who he expects to make the leap to key contributors.

- Despite being at the bottom of the conference standings for awhile, Jared Karstetter said that the Cougars are being taken more serious by other Pac-12 programs.

"Yeah, I think we were more competitive especially the end of last year," he said. "Any sort of lack of respect that we feel as a team, I think that we just use that as motivation to go out there on game day and compete and prove ourselves.

- Wulff talked at length about the type of player he recruits and specifically said the staff is looking for players with their head on straight.

"We've gone about our business to recruit the right type of person," Wulff said. "Great football players that can help you build a team. We go after guys that fit our profile."

- With a good quarterback with plenty of experience behind center in Jeff Tuel and an improved defense, Wulff thinks the team can build on last season and move up in the pecking order.

"I know through spring football, we were executing things we'd never done," he said.
Posted on: July 18, 2011 3:22 pm
Edited on: July 18, 2011 3:22 pm
 

Report: Reggie Bush Heisman back with Bush family

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

When last we tuned into "As the World of Reggie Bush's Heisman Trohpy Turns," the sporting world's most famous doorstop was being stored at USC-friendly museum the San Diego Hall of Champions as reports claimed Bush had elected not to forfeit the trophy after all.

Today's latest news won't do much to refute those reports, unfortunately for those expecting to seeing it returned to the Heisman Trust. According to the Dan Patrick Show, the SDHOC has "returned the 2005 Heisman Trophy to former USC running back Reggie Bush and his parents, Lamar and Denise Griffin."

"In doing so," the SDHOC said in a statement, "the organization feels it is best to direct any further questions to the Bush family or the Heisman Trust.” And with that, you can consider the museum's hands washed of the situation.

We still seem to be a long way from any kind of resolution, though. According to the report, the Trust contacted both the SDHOC and the Bush family last week to ask the trophy be returned to New York's Downtown Athletic Club--potentially the development that triggered the museum's return of the trophy to the Griffins. The same source claimed that the Trust has "made multiple calls to Bush’s representatives" since Bush publicly forfeited "my title" as Heisman winner, without any reponse from Bush's camp.

With Bush continuing to decline comment and the trophy in his family's possession, it seems more likely than ever that if Bush intended to return it, he would. But he doesn't.

We'd previously suggested that Bush simply keep the Heisman if he really wanted to be that bitter and defiant, but that argument was largely based on the assumption the Trust hadn't actually requested Bush return it. If the Trust has not in fact moved on -- if they feel the dignity of their trophy is being compromised somehow -- they're within their rights to expect Bush to return it.

The longer he doesn't, contrary to what Bush seems to hope, the more and more attention will be paid to the issue. It's past time for Bush to either acquiesce to the Trust's wishes or announce that he's not returning it after all; whatever conclusion the situation reaches, it's badly overdue for that conclusion to arrive.

HT: DocSat.
Posted on: July 14, 2011 12:20 pm
Edited on: July 14, 2011 12:45 pm
 

The entire 2011 season simulated on NCAA 12

Posted by Tom Fornelli

After getting my new copy of EA Sports' NCAA Football 12 on Tuesday, I took the time to simulate the entire 2012 season to see what the video game thinks is going to happen this year. In order to make things realistic, I even went through all the trouble of updating rosters to reflect what they currently look like.

That meant moving Russell Wilson from NC State to Wisconsin, removing Terrelle Pryor -- not to mention benching the suspended Buckeyes for the first five games of the season -- removing WaShaun Ealey and Caleb King from Georgia's backfield and so on and so forth.

No need to thank me, it was a labor of love.

So how did things turn out?

Well, it looks as if we'll once again have a non-BCS school finish the year undefeated -- the only school to do so -- but it's not Boise State or TCU. In fact, Boise State finally got its shot at a national title, but it couldn't come through.

Who did?

Let's find out. First we'll start with the conference champions (Records don't include conference championships or bowl games).

ACC -- North Carolina 9-3 (6-2)

Big 12 -- Texas A&M 10-2 (8-1)

Big East -- South Florida 9-3 (6-1)

Big Ten -- Wisconsin 11-1 (7-1)

C-USA -- Houston 12-0 (8-0)

MAC -- Western Michigan 10-2 (7-1)

MWC -- Boise State 12-0 (7-0)

Pac 12 -- Oregon 9-3 (7-2)

SEC -- South Carolina 11-1 (7-1)

Sun Belt -- Troy 10-2 (8-0)

WAC -- Fresno State 8-4 (7-0)

And how about those BCS bowl games? Well I'm glad you asked.

Rose Bowl -- Wisconsin 49, Oregon 46 OT

Fiesta Bowl -- Texas A&M 38, Ohio State 17

Orange Bowl -- North Carolina 28, Alabama 20

Sugar Bowl -- Houston 48, South Florida 13

BCS National Championship -- South Carolina 24, Boise State 22

Yes, that's right, the Ol' Ball Coach has added another national title to his resume. Boise State did have a chance to topple the BCS machine, but couldn't pull through. Trailing 24-16, Kellen Moore hit Kyle Efaw on a 16-yard touchdown with 3 minutes left, but the Broncos couldn't convert the two-point conversion. The Gamecocks ran out the clock and celebrated a national title. Oh, and Stephen Garcia was the game's MVP. Let that marinate in your brain for a minute or two.

As for awards, I hope Houston quarterback Case Keenum used all that time off last season to build himself a trophy case because it looks as if he's going to need one. Keenum not only won the Heisman Trophy, but the Maxwell, Walter Camp and Davey O'Brien trophies to boot. That's what happens when you lead Houston to a 14-0 record yet still finish second in both polls.

Now, if that's not enough info for you, let's take a look at some of the season storylines by conference.

ACC

-- Jimbo Fisher hits the sophomore slump. Florida State doesn't even qualify for a bowl berth after finishing the year 5-7 with a 3-5 mark within the ACC. FSU loses to Oklahoma, Wake Forest, Maryland, NC State, Boston College, Miami and Florida. And of those losses, only the loss to Florida was by less than 10 points.

-- Al Golden has Miami on the right track. Sure, the Canes only went 8-5 during the season, but they did finish 6-2 in ACC play, just missing the ACC title game thanks to a 27-17 loss to North Carolina

-- Duke goes bowling! That's right, Duke finishes the year 7-6 with a 4-4 mark in the ACC, including a two-point win over UNC. Though the Dukies do lose to Florida in the Music City Bowl. I have no idea who Steve Spurrier was rooting for while watching.

-- Boston College is the "best" team in the Atlantic Division. The Eagles finish the year 8-6 with a 5-3 mark in the conference. They even nearly beat UNC in the title game, losing 29-27.

Big 12

-- Oklahoma can't handle the pressure. The Sooners started out the year 7-0 before getting shocked by Kansas State on the road -- where else? -- 24-21. They also lost at Oklahoma State 38-24 to end the regular season and kill their hopes of a BCS berth.

-- Texas won't be terrible two years in a row. The Longhorns finish the season 11-2 with a 7-2 mark in the Big 12. Though they do lose to Oklahoma and Texas A&M, which stings a bit.

-- Where have you gone, Blaine Gabbert? Missouri needs you. The Tigers finished the season 4-8 with a 2-7 mark in the conference. Seems they're going to miss Colorado, Nebraska and the North Division.

Big East

-- The Big East is respectable. While no team in the conference finished the season with less than three losses (Pitt being the only with three), seven of the eight Big East schools won at least seven games, with Rutgers holding the only losing record.

-- Louisville can't finish. The Cardinals led the Big East most of the season before losing four of their last five games to finish 3-4 in the conference.

-- Casino or football field, Dana Holgorsen has a tough time winning anywhere this year. The Mountaineers went 2-5 in the Big East during his inaugural campaign.

Big Ten

-- Who needs Jim Tressel and Terrelle Pryor? Ohio State went 4-1 in its first five games of the season while so many of its playmakers sat out, and though the Buckeyes struggled in Big Ten play, they still finished the year 9-4 and got an at-large berth to the Fiesta Bowl. Oh, and they still beat Michigan.

-- Not that Michigan minded all that much, because Brady Hoke made believers out of the faithful in his first year. That Michigan loss to Ohio State? That was the Wolverines only Big Ten loss of the regular season, as they went 7-1 to win the Legends Division.

-- Wisconsin loves Russell Wilson. Wilson and the Badgers tore up the Big Ten all year long until the final week of the regular season. Then, after being 11-0 and ranked #1 for the majority of the regular season, the Badgers fell at home to Penn State 42-28. Though I guess beating Michigan 34-13 in the first Big Ten Championship Game and then Oregon in the Rose Bowl took some of the sting out of it.

-- New kid Nebraska gets picked on. The Huskers went 3-5 in Big Ten play, even losing to Minnesota. Though that wasn't as embarrassing as the 13-7 loss to Ohio -- University, not State -- in the Texas Bowl.

Pac-12

-- USC isn't on probation in virtual reality. So the Trojans were able to win the Pac-12 South division, even if they did lose to Oregon 35-14 in the inaugural Pac-12 Championship.

-- Utah enjoyed their move more than Colorado. The Utes finished the season 5-4 in conference play while Colorado went 3-6.

-- Andrew Luck should have gone pro. Stanford and Luck were off to a very nice start to the season, opening 7-0. Then Luck broke his arm, missed the rest of the year and Stanford finished 10-3.

SEC

-- The East still stinks. Sure, South Carolina wins the national title, but no other SEC East team managed to win more than four games in the conference. Meanwhile, in the West, LSU had the worst season of anyone, going 7-6 with a 3-5 mark in the SEC. Les Miles needs to eat more grass.

-- Will Muschamp did OK. Florida finished the season 9-4 with a 4-4 mark in the SEC, though Charlie Weis' offense needs some work. The Gators never scored more than 21 points against a SEC opponent not named Vanderbilt.

-- Alabama needs to fire Nick Saban, PAAAAWWWWWWWL. Oh the indignity of Alabama's 2012 season. Not only did the Tide lose the SEC title game to South Carolina, but then they went and lost to North Carolina in the Orange Bowl. Since when does Alabama play in the Orange Bowl, PAAWWWWL? NICK SABAN HAS GOT TO GO.

-- Auburn doesn't miss Cam Newton as much as you'd think. Even without their Heisman winning quarterback, the Tigers still manage to go 8-5 with a 4-4 mark in the conference. Not great, but not terrible either.

Non-BCS

-- TCU would like to get to the Big East ASAP. The Horned Frogs lose twice in 2012, and not just to Boise State. Unlike 2011, TCU wasn't able to escape San Diego State, losing 33-30 at Qualcomm Stadium.

-- Notre Dame is back! The Irish finish the year 10-3, and feature one of the most potent offenses in college football. Why they're painting Brian Kelly over Touchdown Jesus as you read this.

-- BYU finds independence to be constricting. The Cougars first season free of the shackles of conferencedom does not work out very well, as BYU finishes the year 4-8 and even loses to Utah State along the way.

-- While I already went over the disrespect Houston received, what about conference mate Southern Miss? The Golden Eagles finished the regular season 11-1 before losing to Houston in the C-USA title game, and they couldn't even sniff the Top 25.

And that's it. There's the entire 2011 season right there according to a video game. I suppose at this point there's no point in even watching any of the games. Now, if you don't mind me, I'm going to go try and wrap my head around Stephen Garcia leading South Carolina to a national championship.

Can you imagine that party?
Posted on: July 1, 2011 1:07 pm
Edited on: July 5, 2011 10:40 am
 

CBSSports.com All-Time Pac-10 Team

Posted by Bryan Fischer

The Pac-10 is officially no more as of today, and after 33 years, the "Conference of Champions" has given us plenty of college football moments from some of the best players to ever play the game.

To commemorate the best that have worn the Pac-10 logo since Arizona and Arizona State were added in 1978, the record books were opened and the highlight tapes were watched in order to discover just who was the creme of the crop on the West Coast.

It's no surprise to see a healthy Southern California presence on the all-time team; after all, the Trojans won more conference titles than anybody else and have churned out elite players even during downturns. The list itself is actually pretty heavy on teams that will soon form the Pac-12 South, but when you consider that 51 percent of the conference's 132 All-Americans came from one of the two Los Angeles schools, you can see why.

As with most lists, there's plenty to debate, so feel free to voice your opinions in the comments.

With out further ado, the CBSSports.com All-time All-Pac-10 teams:

Pos Player, School Comment
QB Matt Leinart, USC 2004 Heisman Trophy winner, two national titles, Pac-10's career leader in TD passes, lowest percentage of passes intercepted in Pac-10 history, Pac-10 record for touchdowns in a season
RB Marcus Allen, USC 1981 Heisman Trophy winner, College Football Hall of Famer, Pac-10 record for rushes and yards in a season
RB Charles White, USC 1979 Heisman Trophy Winner, College Football Hall of Famer, Pac-10's all-time leading rusher
WR Dwayne Jarrett, USC Pac-10 record for career touchdowns, Two time consensus All-American
WR Troy Walters, Stanford Pac-10 record for career receiving yards, 1999 Biletnikoff Award winner, Stanford and Pac-10 career record for most yards gained
TE Tony Gonzalez, Cal All-Pac-10, All-Ameican
OL Brad Budde, USC College Football Hall of Famer, 1979 Lombardi Award Winner, three-time All-American
OL Tony Boselli, USC Three-time first team All-American, 1994 Morris Trophy
OL Randall McDaniel, Arizona State College Football Hall of Famer, member of 1987 Rose Bowl team, All-American, four-year starter
OL Alex Mack, Cal Two-time Morris Trophy winner, three-time All-Pac-10, 2008 Draddy Trophy winner
OL Jonathan Ogden, UCLA 1995 Outland Trophy winner, All-American, two-time All-Pac-10
DL Tedy Bruschi, Arizona 1995 Morris Trophy winner, Pac-10 career leader in sacks (52), two-time All-American
DL Steve Emtman, Washington 1991 Outland and Lombardi Award winner, All-American, College Football Hall of Famer
DL Terrell Suggs, Arizona State 2002 Ted Hendricks, Lombardi and Nagurski Trophy winner, Pac-10 record for tackles for a loss in a season, NCAA record for sacks in a season
DL Ron Waldrop, Arizona 1993 Outland and Nagurski Award winner, two-time All-American, College Football Hall of Famer
LB Chris Claiborne, USC 1998 Butkus Award winner, All-American, two-time All-Pac-10
LB Ricky Hunley, Arizona College football Hall of Famer, two-time All-American, 31 games with more than 10 tackles
LB Vernon Maxwell, Arizona State Three-time All-American, three-time All-Pac-10, school record for most fumbles in a season
DB Chuck Cecil, Arizona College Football Hall of Famer, 1987 Pac-10 Defensive Player of the Year, All-American, Tied conference record with four interceptions in one game
DB Kenny Easley, UCLA Four-time All-Pac-10, three-time All-American, College Football Hall of Famer
DB Ronnie Lott, USC College Football Hall of Famer, All-American, two-time All-Pac-10
DB Mike Richardson, Arizona State Two-time All-American, four-year starter
RET DeSean Jackson, Cal Pac-10 record for punt returns for touchdowns in a season (4) and career (6)
RET Maurice Jones-Drew, UCLA Holds NCAA record for highest average per punt return, school record for all-purpose yardage, All-American
K John Lee, UCLA Pac-10 record for most points by kicking, Pac-10's career FG percentage leader (85%) and an NCAA record for the most games in which a FG provided the winning margin (10)
P Nick Harris, Cal Consensus All-American, Conference and NCAA record for career punts and yardage

Second team

QB: John Elway, Stanford
RB: Ken Simonton, Oregon State; Toby Gerhart, Stanford
WR: Mike Hass, Oregon State; Keyshawn Johnson, USC
TE: Marcedes Lewis, UCLA
OL: Ryan Kalil, USC; Bruce Matthews, USC; Lincoln Kennedy, Washington; Gary Zimmerman, Oregon; Kris Farris, UCLA
DL: Rien Long, Washington State; Haloti Ngata, Oregon; Sedrick Ellis, USC; Ron Holmes, Washington
LB: Ron Rivera, Cal; Junior Seau, USC; Pat Tillman, Arizona State
DB: Mark Carrier, USC; Antoine Caison, Arizona; Darryl Lewis, Arizona; Troy Polamalu, USC
RET: Sammie Stroughter, Oregon State; Chris Owusu, Stanford
K: Jason Hansen, Washington State
P: Josh Bidwell, Oregon










Posted on: June 30, 2011 2:37 pm
Edited on: July 1, 2011 9:09 am
 

Reggie Bush won't return his Heisman. Should he?

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

No, it does not look as if Reggie Bush has returned his Heisman Trophy to the Downtown Athletic Club just yet. And, yes, it's possible that he's not planning on returning it ... ever.

That's the conclusion reached by reading this Sports By Brooks post in which Brooks cites a "source" close to Bush's family claiming that Bush has already "decided" he won't be returning the nation's most famous athletics trophy after all. Bush said otherwise -- sort of -- back in September, but later handed the trophy over to the San Diego Hall of Champions museum rather than the DAC and the Heisman trust. The New Orleans Times-Picayune reported June 9 that the trophy is still currently in the museum's possession.

So, yes, it seems clear Bush is either not intending to return the trophy (it having been nearly 10 months now since his announcement) or is simply getting his serious procrastinate on, and hoping everyone forgets about that little pledge in the meantime.

That's not happening, and so Bush is coming in for some finger-wagging and tut-tutting. But here's my question: Should Bush have ever agreed to return the trophy in the first place?

It's true that the trophy is entirely ill-gotten, the benefits lavished on Bush's family having made him ineligible long before he headed to New York to pick it up. It's true that giving it up would be the noble, sportsmanlike thing to do, the most genuine apology Bush could make for the transgressions that have hamstrung and tarnished his former USC program.

But it's not as if the Trust needs it for anything; they've made it clear they're not about to go back and award it to Vince Young. In fact, lost in the race to condemn Bush for not returning it is the little fact that, according to the Picayune, the Trust hasn't even asked for it.

Bush also technically never promised to give it back to begin with, saying that he would "forfeit my title as Heisman winner of 2005" rather than forfeit the actual piece of hardware itself. It's as weaselly as weasel words get, but you also can't argue he didn't leave himself an out.

So if he's not returning it so it can be handed off to someone else, or because he promised to, why are so many college football fans (and writers like Brooks) seemingly so hell-bent on seeing it forfeited? It's simple: we want Bush punished. He did wrong. It's not enough that his name is forever synonymous with scandal and sleaze, that's he's persona non grata at the school which used to adore him, that his name has already been stricken from the Heisman's record books. By breaking the NCAA's rules and then winning the trophy, he stole something from us (and, if you're a Texas fan, stole something from Young). And when you're caught stealing something, you give it back, right?

Right--which is why it's far, far from unfair for the Trust to ask for it returned if they want. But we're also talking about a hunk of metal won for accomplishments now six years in the rearview mirror, and if they're willing to simply move on, the rest of us should too. It would be nice, sure, if Bush was a big enough man to give the trophy up. But if he wants to be the much smaller man who desperately holds onto this one keepsake from from the scattered wreckage of his college football career as a drowning man does a piece of flotsam, I think we can be generous enough to let him.


 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com