Tag:Tosh Lupoi
Posted on: February 2, 2012 12:31 am
Edited on: February 2, 2012 3:41 pm
 

National Signing Day Winners and Losers: Pac-12

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Breaking down who won and lost in the Pac-12 on National Signing Day.


WINNERS

Stanford's future backfield. We don't want to say anyone could succeed at quarterback or tailback behind a line featuring Andrus Peat, Kyle Murphy, and John Garnett. Dame Helen Mirren would fail, probably. We wouldn't like Bill Nye, the Science Guy's odds. Most 12-year-olds would struggle.

But when we're talking about an offensive line class David Shaw said "could be one of the best in college football historywithout hyperbole, it's hard to rule anyone out. And when it comes to players like potential 2012 quarterback starter Brett Nottingham or new running back signee Barry J. Sanderswe think the chances of success are so sky-high as to be nearly guaranteed. Jim Harbaugh and Andrew Luck might be gone, but if the results of National Signing Day are any indication, the Cardinal as a program aren't going anywhere.

Players to watch: DT Aziz Shittu, RB Barry J. Sanders, OT Andrus Peat.

The checkbooks of future Pac-12 assistants. The conversions of five-star Shaq Thompson (pictured) and receiver Jordan Payton to Washington from Cal (even if the latter was only temporary) were already evidence enough for the impact of ace recruiter Tosh Lupoi's move from Berkeley to Seattle. The Huskies capping their late surge by stealing away USC commitment Pio Vatuvei and fending off a late challenge from the Trojans for quarterback Cyler Miles was just beating a dead horse, really.

Which is why any coach with bona fide West Coast recruiting connections is likely about to find himself a much hotter commodity than they were before Signing Day began. The Huskies aggressively pursued Topoi, doubled his salary at Cal with their new conference media money, and saw immediate, dramatic dividends. Topoi might have been the first coach to have his wallet fattened overnight by Larry Scott's TV negotiations, but with results like these, he won't be the last.

Washington players to watch: DB Shaq Thompson, ATH Jaydon Mickens, CB Brandon Beaver.

Jim L. MoraTo silence the doubters for good, Mora will have to win on the field as well as the recruiting trail. But there's little doubt that Mora has at least done the latterWith another high-profile Cal exile safely in the fold in Ellis McCarthy, the Bruins spent Signing Day polishing up an already impressive haul with a pair of blue-chip receivers in Payton and Javon Williams--an area of sore need with Nelson Rosario gone.

The Bruin brass appeared to be aiming to hire the next Pete Carroll when they took a chance on Mora, and though there's still a long way to go before the comparison is valid at the collegiate as well as pro level, this class is a heck of a step in that direction.

Players to watch: DT Ellis McCarthyATH Devin FullerDB Ishmael Adams.



LOSERS

Lane Kiffin's pied piper flute. Around mid-afternoon, this was shaping up to be a typical Signing Day for college football's most notorious late-game recruiter; sure, Vatuvei had gon to the Huskies, but Kiffin had also managed to pull both high-upside end Leonard Williams and No. 1 athlete Nelson Agholor (pictured) out of Florida despite each's various Sunshine State suitors. With Miles, Peat, Murphy, and Shittu all considering the Trojans and Murphy's late announcement rumored to be potentially affected by Peat's, another matching set of Signing Day coups appeared within reach.

Instead, the Cardinal swept the big linemen while Miles stuck with the Huskies. Those decisions didn't exactly make the Trojan class a disappointment--far from it, given that it finished 9th in the country while boasting just 16 (uniformly outstanding) recruits. But it does mark the first time that Kiffin wasn't able to simply snap his fingers on Signing Day and come away with a bushel of five-stars; it will be interesting to see if, in 2013, Kiffin doesn't leave things quite so late.

Players to watch: OL Zach Banner, WR Nelson Agholor, OL Jordan Simmons.

Cal. It's not that the Bears' class wasn't solid, maybe even better than solid; Tom Lemming ranked it 15th despite only having 17 signees, and the Bears did an excellent job of filling needs at both offensive line and wide receiver. It's that it was so close to being a game-changing, program-momentum-turning, spectacular class before Lupoi's defection took the air out of the sails. 

Tedford is right that the commitments at the Army All-American game from Thompson, McCarthy, and Payton didn't mean anything on the Bears' bottom line, but it's silly to think they didn't mean the Bears had a clearcut opportunity to sign all three (and others) they couldn't take advantage of. It's debatable, too, when that kind of opportunity will come again for Tedford.

Players to watch: QB Zach Kline, WR Bryce Treggs, OL Freddie Tagoloa  

Oregon State's secondary. Want another example of the impact of position coaches on current Pac-12 recruiting? Look no further than the Beaver defensive backfield, which saw no less than four players decommit after OSU secondary coach Keith Heyward -- like Lupoi -- defected to Washington. (One of them was highly regarded corner Devian Shelton, who did get Kiffined away to USC.) The Beavers recovered to still sign four defensive backs, but when even Mike Riley was admitting there were holes at corner that went unfilled, it's safe to say things didn't go as planned.

Players to watch: OL Isaac Seumalo, TE Caleb Smith, QB Brett VanderVeen  




Maxpreps photos by Gary Jones and Margaret Bowles.
Posted on: January 23, 2012 1:11 pm
 

Washington shells out $2.73M for assistant staff

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

With hires like new defensive coordinator Justin Wilcox and defensive line coach Tosh Lupoi (pictured), Steve Sarkisian has put together an overhauled Washington staff that -- on paper -- ranks as one of the best in the Pac-12, and maybe the country. But not surprisingly, that overhaul has come at a cost.

The Seattle Times reported this weekend that thanks to the substantial raise for coaches like Lupoi over their predecessors, the Huskies are now spending more than any other public school in the Pac-12 on their assistants' salaries. The total bill comes in at $2.73 million, more than any other league school save -- probably -- USC, which is private and not required to release salary information.

Wilcox will make $750,000 this coming season, with escalators in his contract that could pay him as much as $850,000 in 2014. (The salary is an increase on what even his previous SEC-based employer, Tennessee, was paying him.) New offensive coordinator Eric Kiesau will earn $375,000 and Lupoi $350,000--a staggering figure for a position coach outside of the cash-flush Big 12 or SEC, but one likely necessary to pry the coach considered by many the best recruiter on the West Coast away from Cal.

So where is all this cash coming from? In a release, Husky AD Scott Woodward doesn't shy away from the source (emphasis added):

"As we've done since (Sarkisian's) arrival, we are seeking and signing the nation's best coaches, and we are willing and able to do it at market value. Our student-athletes deserve the best leaders and the best facilities to create the best environment to win championships. The expenditure on salaries for football's assistant coaches is a prudent investment of that additional money from the Pac-12 new multimedia contract, into the program that gives the biggest return to all Husky athletes."

By snatching away Tupoi and offering weapons-grade money to Wilcox, the Huskies may have just fired the first shot in what could prove to be the same kind of Pac-12 salary battles the SEC -- see the there-and-back-again journey of Alabama assistant Lance Thompson -- has been waging for years. The only real question is which of their conference rivals is going to issue the next one. 

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Posted on: January 16, 2012 3:24 pm
Edited on: January 16, 2012 5:12 pm
 

Washington adds Cal's Tosh Lupoi to staff

Posted by Chip Patterson

Washington head coach Steve Sarkisian sought to improve his defense over the offseason, and on Monday announced a new addition to the coaching staff that could bring much more than just first-hand Pac-12 experience. After spending four years as Cal's defensive line coach and recruiting coordinator, Tosh Lupoi has been named defensive line coach and defensive run game coordinator at Washington.

“Coach Lupoi is a terrific young coach and a dynamic recruiter,” Sarkisian said in the school's release. “He will have an immediate impact with our team both on the field and in recruiting.”

This will be Lupoi's first move from Berkley since arriving as a freshman defensive lineman in 2000. After finishing his career with the Golden Bears in 2005, Lupoi spent two seasons as a graduate assistant before taking over as defensive line coach. In the last two seasons Cal has led the Pac-12 in total defense, but Lupoi's most impressive credentials have come from his efforts on the recruiting trail.

Lupoi was named the 2010 Rivals Recruiter of the Year, and each of the last two signing classes have ranked in the Top 15 according to most prominent scouting services. Cal's current crop of 2012 recruits ranks No. 9 on MaxPreps's recent ranking of the Top 25 classes.  CBSSports.com's Bryan Fischer writes that Lupoi's addition "will undoubtedly impact both Washington and Cal's recruiting classes this year and in the future."

Don't think this will have an effect on Pac-12 recruiting? Current Cal verbal commit Shaq Thompson (MaxPreps No. 5 overall prospect) offered the following after Lupoi's move became official:



For much more on the impact of Lupoi's addition to Washington's recruiting, check out Bryan Fischer and the Eye On Recruiting.  

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Posted on: November 29, 2010 11:34 am
Edited on: November 29, 2010 12:53 pm
 

Cal suspends assistant for fake injury strategy

Posted by Tom Fornelli

There was a whole lot of uproar and outrage coming from the Pacific Northwest following Oregon's win over Cal a few weeks ago, as there was plenty of evidence that Cal players were faking injuries on defense in an attempt to slow the Oregon offense down during the Ducks' 15-13 win on November 13. It was rather obvious in this video that a Cal defensive lineman wasn't really hurt when he went down, unless a sniper in the crowd shot him in the leg with a BB gun.

Well, head coach Jeff Tedford denied it at first, but now it seems that the head coach has changed his tune.  Cal suspended defensive line coach Tosh Lupoi over the weekend for being the mastermind behind the evil plot.

"This is a young coach who made a mistake. We make mistakes in life a lot," said Cal AD Sandy Barbour in a statement. "He stood up and he accepted responsibility for it. The head coach accepted responsibility for it and I accepted responsibility for it. That's what we do as educators."

While Lupoi may have fallen on his sword, Tedford has no plans on firing him.

"I respect him a great deal," Tedford said. "In the heat of the battle and trying to get a substitution in, he used poor judgment. That's no reflection on his character whatsoever or his love for Cal and the program. ... He's a great football coach. A mistake was made. I'm sure we'll learn from it as a whole. We will make sure that we stand for the right things and move forward."

Yes, I'm sure Tedford and his coaching staff will learn from it in the future.  Next year, they'll make sure that their players know to fake the injury before being sent out there, instead of waiting for a signal from a rogue coach on the sideline.  Whom I'm sure was acting alone.
 
 
 
 
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