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Tag:Terrance Ganaway
Posted on: December 30, 2011 1:26 am
Edited on: December 30, 2011 1:27 am
 

QUICK HITS: Baylor 67 Washington 56



Posted by Tom Fornelli


BAYLOR WON. Well, Baylor did win the game, but in reality anybody who watched the Alamo Bowl on Thursday night won. Except for defensive coordinators around the country who no doubt found themselves curled up in the fetal position mumbling something about open-field tackling while drooling on themselves by the time this one was over. This is not an easy game to recap because so much happened. It's kind of like the night you went out to celebrate your 21st birthday. You know you had a good time doing it, but you don't remember most of it.

Still, I shall try.

There were 17 touchdowns scored in this game. That's one touchdown for every 3 minutes and 31 seconds of game time. Baylor and Washington combined for 123 points (2.05 points per minute) and 1,397 yards of total offense. Robert Griffin had 350 total yards and 2 touchdowns and he wasn't even the best quarterback in San Antonio as Washington's Keith Price went for 477 total yards and 7 touchdowns. And his team lost! Then there was Baylor's Terrance Ganaway, who rushed for 200 yards and 5 touchdowns (as a team Baylor rushed for 482 yards). Of the 17 touchdown drives in this game, 11 took less than 3 minutes off of the clock.

I'm not sure who the leading tackler was, but if he had more than 3 tackles I'll be shocked because I'm not sure there were 3 tackles in this entire game. It was insane, it was never-ending, and it was one of the greatest things that ever happened.

WHY BAYLOR WON. There's really no one thing that happened in this game that you can pinpoint as the reason that Baylor won, but if you had to give one of the "defenses" credit, I'd guess it would have to be Baylors. Not only did they hold Washington under 60, but the Bears outscored the Huskies 43-21 in the second half.

WHEN BAYLOR WON. The game came to an end when Washington faced a 4th and 8 in the final minutes while down 60-56 and couldn't convert. Though when Ganaway broke loose for a 43-yard touchdown a few plays later to make the score 67-56 with 2:28 left in the game, you legitimately wondered if Baylor had left too much time on the clock.

WHAT BAYLOR WON. Baylor won it's tenth game of the season, which is a huge milestone for the program. It also helped showcase just how insanely good a year Heisman winner Robert Griffin had. I mean, Griffin played on a Baylor team that allowed 35.7 points per game coming into this game, and gave up 56 points on the night, and the Bears still won 10 games. Wrap your head around that one. 

WHAT WASHINGTON LOST. Well, each player on Washington probably lost about 15 pounds in this game from running up and down the field for 60 minutes. Other than that, I'm not sure you can say the Huskies lost all that much. We saw the same Huskies tonight that we've seen all season: a team that is very capable of putting 50 points on the board but just as capable of allowing 60. Much like the team they played. Yes, this is a loss that stings as all losses do, but it won't be long before everyone on this Washington team looks back on this game and can do nothing but laugh at the insanity of it all.

THAT WAS CRAZY: Have you read this recap? This entire game was crazy.

FINAL GRADE: A++++++++. I'd give it more pluses but you probably get the point. No, this game was not the type of game that defensive-minded football fans would enjoy, but it was 60 minutes of pure entertainment. There is not a single doubt in my mind that anybody who watched will forever remember this Alamo Bowl.
Posted on: December 7, 2011 2:57 pm
Edited on: December 7, 2011 2:58 pm
 

CBSSports.com 2011 All-Big 12 Team

Posted by Tom Fornelli

The season has wrapped, the bowl games are set and it's time to hand out some awards. As part ofCBSSports.com's look at the regular season, here is the best of the Big 12 conference.

Awards

OFFENSIVE PLAYER OF THE YEAR

Robert Griffin, quarterback, Baylor

When it comes to choosing only one person to be the Offensive Player of the Year in a conference that features so many potent offenses as the Big 12, it's not easy. Or at least, it shouldn't be. Still, despite all the amazing offensive players in the Big 12 this season, the choice here was pretty clear for me. Robert Griffin set an NCAA record with his 192.3 efficiency rating this season, all while throwing for 3,998 yards and 36 touchdowns compared to only 6 interceptions. No one player was more important to his team this season than Griffin was, and he'll likely be adding a Heisman Trophy to his collection soon enough.

DEFENSIVE PLAYER OF THE YEAR

Frank Alexander, defensive line, Oklahoma

There were a few other players I considered for this like Iowa State's A.J. Klein and Texas A&M's Sean Porter, but in the end I went with Alexander. He was a force on the defensive line for one of the conference's best defenses all season long. Alexander finished the season leading the Big 12 in tackles for loss with 18, and was tied with Porter for most sacks in the conference with 8.5.

FRESHMAN OF THE YEAR

Quandre Diggs, defensive back, Texas

This was between Diggs and Kansas State's Tyler Lockett for me, but I went with Diggs since Lockett missed the final three weeks of the season. I also went with Diggs because he deserves the honor, picking off 3 passes and breaking up another 13 while making 46 tackles for the Longhorns in 2011.

COACH OF THE YEAR

Bill Snyder, Kansas State

This was extremely tough, as I mulled between Snyder, Mike Gundy and Art Briles for a while. In the end I went with Snyder because I'm still amazed by what he's now done twice in Manhattan. I had a feeling before the season began that Kansas State would be better than we thought, but I didn't see a 10-2 season and a near berth in a BCS bowl being possible. So because of that I have to give the nod to Snyder.

All-Big 12 Offense

QUARTERBACK

Robert Griffin, Baylor

He was my offensive player of the year, so he's my selection for quarterback here as well. Though I'd be remiss if I didn't give a tip of my non-existent cap to Brandon Weeden and Collin Klein.

RUNNING BACKS

Terrance Ganaway, Baylor and Henry Josey, Missouri

When it comes to the Baylor offense, Griffin and the passing game get a lot of credit, but Ganaway is what helps make that passing attack even more dangerous. When you have a running back who rushes for a Big 12-best 1,347 yards and 16 touchdowns, defenses can't just drop back into coverage and take away your passing game. Ganaway's presence gives Baylor its balance. As for Henry Josey, he finished the season averaging more yards per game than any other Big 12 running back and would have led the conference in rushing yards if not for a knee injury against Texas that cost him the last few weeks of the season. Still, 1,168 yards in 10 games and over 8 yards a carry will get you here injury or not.

WIDE RECEIVERS

Kendall Wright, Baylor and Justin Blackmon, Oklahoma State

Too many deserving receivers to choose from, but I went with Wright and Blackmon. Somebody had to be on the receiving end of all those Robert Griffin passes, and Wright was the most popular target. He led the conference with 1,572 receiving yards and had 13 touchdowns. Only one receiver finished the year with more receptions and touchdowns than Wright, and that was Oklahoma State's Blackmon. He came into the season with enormous expectations considering what he did in 2010, and though he didn't match those numbers, 113 receptions for 1,336 yards and 15 touchdowns is one hell of a letdown. Also, honorable mention to Ryan Broyles who had his senior season cut short and Texas A&M's Ryan Swope.

TIGHT END

Michael Egnew, Missouri

This wasn't that hard of a decision since Egnew led all Big 12 tight ends in receptions (47), yards (484), and was tied in touchdowns (3). Egnew was a reliable target for James Franklin all season.

OFFENSIVE LINE

Grant Garner, Oklahoma State; Levy Adcock, Oklahoma State; Gabe Ikard, Oklahoma, Kelechi Osemele, Iowa State, Jeremiah Hatch, Kansas

No matter what kind of scheme you use, there are no great offenses without great offensive lines, which means the Big 12 had plenty to choose from. Trying to pare a long list down to five was not easy, but these are the guys who stood out to me the most all season.

All-Big 12 Defense

DEFENSIVE LINE

Frank Alexander, Oklahoma; Ronnell Lewis, Oklahoma; Ray Kibble, Kansas State; Alex Okafor, Texas

If you're an offensive lineman and you look across the line of scrimmage to see these four men in your face, you know you are going to be in for a long day. Whether getting to the quarterback or stuffing the run, all four of these lineman had their names called quite often this season.

LINEBACKERS

Arthur Brown, Kansas State; A.J. Klein, Iowa State; Sean Porter, Texas A&M

While Porter was tied for the Big 12 lead with 8.5 sacks, Klein was a tackling machine for the Cyclones with 101 tackles and also proved useful in coverage. Then there's Arthur Brown who, in my opinion, may be the best all-around linebacker in the conference. Whether stopping the run, in pass coverage, or just being wherever he needs to be to make a big play. Kansas' Steven Johnson and Texas' Emmanuel Acho also deserve a mention here.

SECONDARY

Nigel Malone, Kansas State; Jamell Fleming, Oklahoma; Markelle Martin, Oklahoma State, E.J. Gaines, Missouri

If you're a cornerback or a safety at a Big 12 school, you are going to be tested week in and week out. There's no way around it, and some plays you're going to get beat, as it happens to everybody. Still, more often than not, these were the four defensive backs whom I saw making the plays their defenses needed them to make this season.

SPECIALISTS

PK Randy Bullock, Texas A&M; P Quinn Sharp, Oklahoma State; Returner Tyler Lockett, Kansas State

I could have gone with Quinn Sharp for both punter and placekicker as he performed both duties for Oklahoma State this season, and performed extremely well in both jobs. I decided to go with Bullock however as he was called on more often than Sharp to put points on the board and did so at the same rate. Then there's Tyler Lockett who was one of the more exciting returners in the conference this season, with two kickoffs returned for touchdowns. He just slightly edged out Texas' Fozzy Whittaker.
Posted on: December 3, 2011 7:09 pm
Edited on: December 3, 2011 7:10 pm
 

QUICK HITS: Baylor 48 Texas 24

Posted by Tom Fornelli

BAYLOR WON. Baylor took what had been a close game going into the locker room at halftime, and then completely blew the doors off of it in the second half. It was enough to make you wonder if Texas had picked up some kind of virus in College Station last week. Baylor rode a wave of Texas turnovers in the second half to outscore the Longhorns 24-3 over the final 30 minutes. Robert Griffin also got over a slow start in the first half that saw him throw his first interception of the season at home, and he finished the day with 352 total yards and 4 total touchdowns. Whether that will be enough to give him a push in the Heisman race we'll have to wait and see.  Terrance Ganaway had another big day on the ground as well, rushing for 152 yards and 2 touchdowns.

Case McCoy finished the day with 356 yards passing and 3 touchdowns, but it was his 4 interceptions that killed the Longhorns in the second half.

HOW BAYLOR WON. With a whole lot of help from Texas. I don't think it's a coincidence that the Baylor offense didn't really get in gear until the second half when the Longhorns started giving the ball away like your grandma does candy. The Longhorns turned the ball over 6 times on Saturday, 4 of which came in the second half, and Baylor was all too willing to take advantage of them.

WHEN BAYLOR WON. Following another Texas turnover in the fourth quarter, Griffin found Terrance Williams for a 39-yard touchdown strike with 7:43 to go to make the score 48-24. Whatever hope Texas still had before that point was quickly snuffed out.

WHAT BAYLOR WON. Since Kansas State also won the chances aren't as great, but it's still possible that Baylor can get an at-large berth to a BCS bowl. I just wouldn't bet my life on it if I were you. Outside of that, it was Baylor's ninth win of the season which means that if it should win its bowl game it'll finish the season with 10 wins, a nice milestone for the program. Also, though they don't keep track of it officially, Baylor became the Texas State Champions of the Big 12 this season, finishing higher in the standings than Texas, Texas A&M and Texas Tech and let's not forget that win over TCU to start the season.

WHAT TEXAS LOST. This would have been a nice win for Texas for a few reasons. First, it's always nice to beat your in-state rivals in the conference, but a win also would have meant the Longhorns finished the regular season 8-4. Instead Texas has to settle for 7-5, and though that's better than last season's 5-7, it's not exactly the type of year that Texas likes to hang its hat on.
Posted on: November 26, 2011 11:17 pm
 

QUICK HITS: Baylor 66 Texas Tech 42

Posted by Tom Fornelli

BAYLOR WON. Oh the points, there were so many of them on Saturday night in Cowboys Stadium. I mean, how often does a team score 42 points and lose a game by 24? What makes all of this even more unbelievable is that Baylor played the entire second half of this contest without Robert Griffin who missed the final 30 minutes after suffering a head injury late in the second quarter. Griffin still managed to account for 168 total yards and 3 touchdowns before leaving, but his replacement, Nick Florence, managed 165 total yards and 3 touchdowns of his own in his place. Though the real workhorse for Baylor on Saturday was Terrance Ganaway, who carried the ball 42 times for 246 yards and 2 touchdowns.

Seth Doege threw for 343 yards and 3 touchdowns for Texas Tech, but his 2 interceptions played a huge role in this game as well. Eric Ward caught 16 passes for 151 yards and 2 touchdowns. As you can tell, there was a lot of offense in this one, as both teams combined for 1,049 yards.

WHY BAYLOR WON. In a game like this, where neither defense seems all that interested in forcing the other team to punt, turnovers are going to play a huge role, and they did in this one. The biggest reason Baylor won this game is that it turned the ball over twice while Texas Tech turned it over 4 times. You can't afford to give possessions away in a game like this, and Texas Tech did too many times.

WHEN BAYLOR WON. This was a game in which no lead felt safe, but when Nick Florence scored from a yard out to make it 59-42 with just over 9 minutes left it was basically done. There was no way Texas Tech could be counted on to stop Baylor three times.

WHAT BAYLOR WON. For the first time since both schools joined the Big 12, Baylor beat Texas Tech. That wasn't the only landmark for the Bears in this game either, as Baylor has now won 5 Big 12 games for the first time since joining the conference and has a chance to reach 9 wins before the regular season ends. Which means a 10-win season is still in play, which would be a huge accomplishment for Art Briles' team.

WHAT TEXAS TECH LOST. There will be no bowl game for Texas Tech. For the first time since 1992 the Red Raiders will finish a season with a losing record. Not exactly what Tommy Tuberville was hoping for in his second season in Lubbock, but the Raiders just suffered so many injuries down the stretch that I'm not sure what more he could have done.

THAT WAS CRAZY. There are so many things from this game that I could cite as insane, but how about this one: Baylor scored 31 points in the first half with Robert Griffin in the game. It scored 35 points in the second half without him. Who would have thought that would be possible? 
Posted on: January 14, 2011 9:21 pm
Edited on: January 16, 2011 3:20 pm
 

5 Up: Potential 2011 sleeper teams

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Earlier today, our own Dennis Dodd posted his pre-preseason Top 25 for the 2011 college football season. We here at the College Football Blog wouldn't dare disagree with our esteemed colleague's opinions ... but every year there's teams that vastly exceed the expectations of even the wisest prognosticators (like, say, Auburn in 2010) and some that disappoint despite some seemingly major advantages (like, say, Iowa in 2010).

So earlier today we named five that are in his Top 25 that might slip out or could otherwise disappoint, and right now we'll name five more teams we think can crack that Top 25 next season. Without further ado (and in no particular order):

1. Baylor - The good news for Baylor: dynamic quarterback Robert Griffin III is back along with most of the offense, and while he loses starting tailback Jay Finley to graduation, Finley's backups Terrance Ganaway and Jarred Salubi provide an intriguing balance of power and speed -- they both return. In addition, RG3 gets his top five receivers back (all of whom caught at least 40 passes this year), and three-year starting lineman Philip Baker will be the anchor at center for a mostly intact offensive line. Yes, Baylor still looks wretched at times on defense (53 points to Oklahoma and 55 to Oklahoma State aren't exactly solid efforts), so there's no telling whether the Bears' losses on that side of the ball are addition by subtraction or not, but one thing's for sure: there'll be points put up in Waco in 2011.

2. Illinois - This spot would likely go to fellow "Leader" Penn State if it weren't for the fact that PSU's replacing Evan Royster, two leading receivers, its two best offensive linemen, and there's really no telling who's starting at QB in 2011. Oh, and most of the Penn State defense -- including two of three starting LBs -- is graduating too. Contrast that with Illinois , who found a star quarterback in freshman Nathan Scheelhaase this year and returns four of five starting offensive linemen. The Illini won't miss early declarant Mikel LeShoure much with Jason Ford (who's basically a human truck) waiting to take over at tailback. The defense will definitely miss Martez Wilson and Corey Liuget on the interior, on the other hand; those guys were anchors of a stout rushing defense and their backups are unremarkable. Still, Illinois' 2011 schedule looks primed for some upsets, and nine wins is hardly out of the question. If Wilson and Liuget were returning, Illinois would probably be in Dodd's Top 25, but it's not as if no borderline-Top 25 team has ever exceeded expectations after losing two juniors to the NFL.

3. Utah - Everything's going to come crashing down once Utah joins a "real" conference, right? Maybe not. If QB Jordan Wynn recovers from December shoulder surgery in time for the season (which he should, but six months of rehab can turn into nine without the patient doing anything wrong), he'll be a third-year starter with a reasonable set of returning players. Senior wideout/returner Shaky Smithson is sure to be missed, but this is college football; so it goes. And while Utah's schedule looks daunting, it really could be worse; the Utes miss both Oregon and Stanford in inter-divisional play, and neither BYU nor Pitt should be as tough of matchups as they'd have been over the past couple years. In addition, the schedule's pretty top-heavy, and it's easily possible that Utah wins at least five of six down the stretch. Head coach Kyle Whittingham keeps proving predictions wrong by not bolting for a paycheck elsewhere, and now he's got a chance to lead his Utes into battle in a real conference and destroy the "mid-major" label that's been dogging the program -- even through multiple BCS bowl wins! -- once and for all.

4. Oregon State - Meanwhile, in the Pac-12 North, the Oregon State Beavers have a chance to make noise. Yes, Oregon and Stanford are the class of the division and should remain so for the near future, but don't sleep on the passing skills of QB Ryan Katz , especially now that he'll have his first full season as a starter under his belt. With the game slowing down for him and with Markus Wheaton and James Rodgers both returning at WR (to say nothing of Joe Halahuni coming back at TE), Katz should be able to more effectively use his NFL-caliber arm to put some points up in Corvallis. The offense will miss Jacquizz Rodgers desperately, and while deserved, his jump to the NFL will likely cost the Beavers a win or two. So while the defense struggled in 2010 and stands to lose several seniors, it may not matter in a Pac-12 with several struggling offenses and an OSU attack that should set 30+ points per game as a goal. Scheduling a road date at Wisconsin might not have been the wisest idea, though. Still, look for a push from Oregon State to hit that eight-win mark, which against a schedule like this could mean a spot in the Top 25 when it's all said and done.

5. Tennessee - Dodd ranks eight SEC teams in his Top 25 (26, really, but whatever). We're not sure all will end up ranked at the end of the 2011 season, but one thing seems clear: of the four teams he left out -- Kentucky , Ole Miss , Tennessee , and Vanderbilt -- Tennessee's the closest thing to a contender of the four. No, the SEC East shouldn't spend its entire season on fire like last year, where South Carolina took the division trophy in a five-loss season, but Florida 's going to be experiencing major upheaval and Georgia will be missing A.J. Green (again). With Tyler Bray coming off a successful freshman campaign and returning starting RB Tauren Poole and deep threat wideout Justin Hunter , we could see the Vols make some noise. On defense, the only major loss is leading tackler Nick Reveiz ; Herman Lathers made strides along with the rest of the defense down the stretch, and the secondary returns intact. If there's ever a time to make a run in the East, it's -- well, okay, it was 2010. 2011's not a bad opportunity for the Vols either, though.



Posted on: October 9, 2010 2:03 pm
 

Shootout in the Cotton Bowl

Posted by Tom Fornelli

While this week's game at the Cotton Bowl and the Texas State Fair may not be as popular as last week's game between Texas and Oklahoma (judging by all the empty seats, it's no where near as popular), through the first thirty minutes it's been a lot more entertaining.  Well, unless you're one of those people who actually like seeing defenses make stops in a football game.  If not, then the Cotton Bowl is nirvana this afternoon.

At halftime -- and I stress the word HALFTIME -- of the game between Texas Tech and Baylor there have been nine touchdowns scored.  That's an average of one touchdown for every three minutes and 20 seconds of game played, as the Red Raiders lead the Bears 35-28 at halftime.

Here's an idea of some of the things you've missed if you're not watching this game.
  • After scoring a touchdown to tie the game 7-7 early, Texas Tech tried an onside kick.  The kick didn't go the required ten yards so Texas Tech players kind of just stared at it for a while, then Baylor's Terrance Ganaway picked it up and returned it 38 yards for a touchdown.
  • One one play I saw two Texas Tech defenders literally just stand and watch as a Baylor wide receiver caught a pass on a short slant route and took off downfield.  He was ten yards away before either realized they should try and tackle him.
  • The Red Raiders have 382 yards of offense, including 269 yards and three touchdowns from Taylor Potts.
  • Baylor "only" has 267 yards of offense, which means that over its last six quarters the Bears have managed 945 yards of offense and 83 points.
Seriously, if you haven't been watching this game this morning, you need to find it on your television somewhere.  We could see a team score 70 points and lose today.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com