Tag:Southern Illinois
Posted on: November 15, 2011 7:43 pm
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Ole Miss suspends QB Mackey, RB Scott

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Two of the precious few bright spots for the Ole Miss offense aren't going to shine against LSU--and maybe not again this season.

Houston Nutt announced after the Rebels' Tuesday practice that starting quarterback Randall Mackey and leading rusher Jeff Scott would be suspended for at least Saturday's home game against the Bayou Bengals due to a violation of team rules. Also suspended was backup wide receiver Korvic Neat.

Though the trio's status was not confirmed for the Rebels' season finale against archrivals Mississippi State in the annual Egg Bowl, Nutt did say the length of the suspension "looks like two (games)."

Nutt declined to specify what rules the trio had broken, but said that his recent firing and the disappointing season was "tough for a lot of them. Especially when the season doesn’t go just right, it’s easy to let go.” 

The suspensions will do absolutely nothing to help the Rebels' already microscopically slim chances of victory against LSU. Scott was one of the Rebels' few dependable playmakers, having picked up 529 yards and six touchdowns rushing this season on a respectable (give nthe state of the offense as a whole) 4.6 yards per-carry average.

Mackey's numbers, meanwhile, aren't overwhelming -- a 50 percent completion rate, 7.2 yards per-attempt average, and a 7-to-5 TD-to-INT ratio -- but are far better than the ones posted by new starter Zack Stoudt, who in five apperances posted a 4.9 YPA and 2-to-7 TD-to-INT ratio. With Stoudt at the helm, the Rebels failed to top 315 yards of offense against any of four opponent,s including FCS Southern Illinois; with Mackey installed, the Rebels have topped that number in four of out of six tries.

The Rebels already had a huge mountain to climb ... something like, say, Kilimanjaro. Now? Beating LSU will be like going up K2 ... without oxygen ... in flippers.
Posted on: November 7, 2011 11:11 am
Edited on: November 7, 2011 12:39 pm
 

Nutt to be fired, Ole Miss AD stepping down



Posted by Tom Fornelli

UPDATE: From CBSSports.com's Bruce Feldman

Expect to hear that former Ole Miss great Archie Manning and FedEX VP Mike Glenn to be announced as heading the Ole Miss search committee to replace Houston Nutt. Rebel AD Pete Boone will step down, which may get categorized as him "retiring" and have no real role in the school's coaching search, a source at Ole Miss told CBS Monday morning.



It's a move that most people have been expecting to happen, but Ole Miss' 30-13 loss to Kentucky on Saturday appears to have been the final nail in Houston Nutt's coffin. According to reports, Nutt has been informed by the school that this will be his final season at Ole Miss.

Nutt came to Ole Miss in 2008 after serving as head coach at SEC West rival Arkansas from 1998 to 2007. Nutt's tenure at Ole Miss started with a lot of promise, as his Rebels went 9-4 in each of his first two seasons and won consecutive Cotton Bowls. Since then, however, things haven't been nearly as encouraging.

Nutt's team followed those Cotton Bowl wins with a 4-8 record in 2010, including a 1-7 mark in SEC play. So far in 2011 the Rebels are 2-7 and 0-6 in conference play, including a school record 12 consecutive conference losses. His team's only wins on the season have come against Southern Illinois and Fresno State.

Nutt's record at Ole Miss is currently 24-23, but it's the 10-20 mark in the SEC that has ultimately led to this.
Posted on: September 25, 2011 5:50 pm
 

Minnesota coach Jerry Kill readmitted to hospital

Posted by Chip Patterson

Minnesota head coach Jerry Kill announced on Sunday that he is readmitting himself to the hospital to treat ongoing seizure issues he has been suffering since his incident on Sept. 10.

Kill suffered a seizure in the fourth quarter of Minnesota's home loss to New Mexico State two weeks ago, and admitted to dealing with multiple seizure events since that scare.  He was last released from the hostpital on Sept. 15, just five days after the event.

“Coach Kill is determined to get this issue resolved,” director of athletics Joel Maturi said in an official release. “We all want what’s best for him, and his health is our first and foremost concern. I have full confidence that our football staff will get the team prepared while Jerry is away. We all want him back on the sidelines. But it’s time to find a resolution.”

According to the school, Kill suffered another seizure on Sunday morning. The Gophers' head coach is in good condition and his vital signs are reportedly "strong." There is no timetable for his dismissal from the Mayo Clinic or his return to the sideline for the team.

For more information on the Golden Gophers be sure to check out our Minnesota Rapid Reports.

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Posted on: September 15, 2011 4:46 pm
 

Jerry Kill released from hospital

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Five days after suffering a seizure on the sidelines during his team's 28-21 loss to New Mexico State, Minnesota head coach Jerry Kill has been released from the hospital, according to Gopher team doctor Pat Smith.

“He is in good spirits and eager to get back to work," Smith said. "He has no restrictions and is free to return to work when he feels up to it."

The question hanging over the Gophers as they prepare to take on a potentially underrated Miami (Ohio) team is this: could Kill "return to work" as soon as this Saturday?

He's done it before; as the head coach at Southern Illinois, Kill suffered a seizure and returned to the Saluki sideline the following weekend. And Kill's assistants have already gone on record as saying they'd be "shocked" if Kill wasn't back in his Gopher headset this Saturday. Kill has already been discussing his team's gameplan with coordinators Tracy Claeys (defense) and Matt Limegrover (offense) from his hospital room.

And thanks to the continuity between Kill and his staff -- Claeys has been on Kill's staffs for the past 15 years, Limegrover the previous 12 -- Kill could likely step in this late in the week without much disruption at all to the team's preparation. From a football standpoint, the only question is whether (as Smith said) Kill feels "up to it."

We won't pretend we're not hoping he is, since his team (and arguably all of college football) could use the kind of inspirational moment Kill leading the Gophers out of the tunnel would provide. But until Kill says one way or the other, We'll simply have to wait to see if it comes to pass.

Posted on: September 8, 2011 3:58 pm
Edited on: September 8, 2011 5:44 pm
 

SEC Interrogation, Week 2

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Each Thursday we demand the SEC give us answers to its most pressing questions. Here those are:




Mike Bobo: do you know what you're doing with an up-tempo shotgun offense?  After rumblings from fall camp that Georgia would unveil a no-huddle spread offense gainst Boise State, the Bulldogs didn't quite go the full Dana Holgorsen ... but they definitely flirted with it, breaking away from their traditional pro-style I-formation look for a multitude of quick snaps, multi-receiver sets, and shotgun handoffs. The results were occasionally spectacular (see Brandon Boykin's 80-yard touchdown run) but more frequently sputterrific (see the other 25 rushes for all of 57 yards, or Boise's six sacks).

So why the change? "We wanted to get more plays, which we didn’t do on Saturday,” Bulldog coordinator Bobo said. “But we’re committed to doing it, and more plays equals more opportunities, and more chances to score.”

This is true, technically speaking. A faster tempo does lead to more possessions and plays packed into a game, and more scoring chances. But that's true for both teams, not just the one running the no-huddle; barring onside kick shenanigans or the occasional odd break at the end of a half, possessions in football are always going to be equal. For seasoned practitioners of the no-huddle like Holgorsen or Gus Malzahn, tempo is partially about giving their offense as many opportunities as possible, but it's also about making it more efficient by keeping an opposing defense off-balance and wearing it down over the course of 60 minutes.

Bobo is not one of those seasoned practitioners. As the Athens Banner-Herald points out, in 2010 Georgia ran fewer plays than any other team in the SEC. Suddenly lurching into a part-time, only-half-committed shotgun spread outfit seems from here to be a good way to neither execute that plan well nor the Bulldogs' traditional power-running and play-action bread-and-butter. One Georgia blogger has cleverly referred to Bobo's plan as the Cheesecake Factory offense--one that attempts to do everything, and in the end does none of it well enough to win.

Mark Richt, for what it's worth, is firmly on board with Bobo's approach. But if it doesn't pay far more dividends against South Carolina than it did against Boise (and if there's a bigger red flag than giving up six sacks to the Broncos the week before facing Devin Taylor, Melvin Ingram and Jadeveon Clowney, we haven't seen it), Richt may pay for that support with an 0-2 start and the hottest seat in the country.



Auburn's defensive line: what can you do with Mississippi State? The surprising thing about Utah State's 84-play slice-and-dice job on the Tiger defense wasn't the 22-of-31 passing from true freshman Chuckie Keeton, or the resulting 13-of-20 mark for the Aggies on third- and fourth-down conversions; Ted Roof's Tiger teams have always had issues with a tight, controlled passing game like USU's. But they've also usually been stout enough against the run to make up for that Achilles heel -- Auburn led the SEC in rush defense last year -- making the true stunner the Aggies' 227 yards on the ground.

Unfortunately for Roof and the Tigers, things only get tougher this week. State boasts the league's best dual-threat quarterback in Chris Relf, a veteran line featuring three senior starters, Dan Mullen's tried-and-true option schemes, and one of the nation's most underrated tailbacks in Vick Ballard. Even Auburn is obviously a far cry from Memphis, but the 309 rushing yards and 8.1 yard per-carry average racked up by the Bulldogs in Week 1 still make for a hell of a warning shot across the bow of the Tiger front seven.

That front seven should get a boost with the return of suspended senior linebacker Eltoro Freeman, and Roof's long track record of run-stuffing success suggests some level of improvement is due. But the Tiger front remains so young -- all four starting defensive linemen are sophomores -- that it will take a major, major leap forward for Auburn to avoid getting steamrolled. Are they up to it?



Alabama: is your offense good enough to stake a claim to No. 1? Maybe we'll be proven wrong about this. But the guess here is that despite the change of venue to Happy Valley, there won't be any more competitive drama in Saturday's Alabama-Penn State clash than there was in last year's 24-3 Tide throttling in Tuscaloosa. Nick Saban's loaded roster of future pros dominated the Nittany Lions physically in nearly every aspect of the 2010 meeting, and that's not a problem we see Joe Paterno repairing in the space of one offseason.

Which means the burning question is one of degree: does the Tide offense have the chops to go on the road and put together a performance worthy of putting the team in the top-of-the-polls discussion? Underrated though Kent State's defense may be (10th in FBS total defense in 2010), the Tide still looked surprisingly sloppy on attack, despite the 48-7 final. The quarterbacks threw four interceptions; the offensive line missed a handful of assignments; the Tide receivers and quarterbacks put the ball on the ground four times.

Were those opening-week jitters ... or something more serious that might deprive the Tide of championships once the 2011 season is finished? A dominant performance against a Lion team with plenty of questions of its own in the front seven would go a long way towards affirming it was the former.

Also worth asking: Can Tennessee's Janzen Jackson-less secondary hold up against Cincinnati's lively passing game? (The league's most underrated Week 2 matchup could be decided here.) Can Vanderbilt  look like a real team another real team? (Despite their 45-14 win over FCS Elon, the 'Dores were outgained by 14 yards. Jury's well out.) Will Kentucky or Ole Miss show any signs of life on offense? (If the 'Cats and Rebels can't get better against Central Michigan and Southern Illinois, respectively, it's going to be a long season.)
Posted on: September 5, 2011 12:58 pm
 

SEC injuries: Rebels' Bolden, UGA's Ogletree out

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Georgia
and Ole Miss both suffered demoralizing losses on the field Saturday, and even worse for Mark Richt and Houston Nutt, a pair of key injuries have been added to those insults.

In Athens, sophomore linebacker Alec Ogletree had been one of the stars of the Bulldogs' offseason after his move from safety. But Ogletree broke his foot against Boise State and will be out four-to-six weeks, Richt said.

"That's a big blow," Richt added. "With the depth we have there, we couldn’t afford that type of injury." Senior walk-on Jeremy Sulek replaced Ogletree against the Broncos, tying for the team lead with seven tackles. But freshman Amarlo Herrera and junior Mike Gilliard will have a chance to compete for the job this week as the Bulldogs prepare for South Carolina.

But if Ogletree's injury hurts, the one suffered by Rebel running back Brandon Bolden could be downright devastating. With nearly 1,600 career yards under his belt and a veteran offensive line in front of him, the senior was expected to be the linchpin of the Ole Miss offense and a potential All-SEC-caliber performer for an attack that desperately needed one.

But Bolden left the Rebels' 14-13 loss to BYU with an ankle injury after just four carries, and Nutt told reporters afterward that he believed Bolden had fractured the ankle.

Bolden is scheduled for an MRI that could rule him out for the season. He was replaced against the Cougars by backups Jeff Scott and Enrique Davis, who each left Saturday's game for periods with injuries. But both are believed to be healthy enough to play this week, when the Rebels take on FCS Southern Illinois.

Sitting at 0-1 following disappointing 2010 seasons and with their coaches under fire, neither the Bulldogs nor Rebels look capable of affording any further setbacks. But unless they can find quality replacements for Ogletree and Bolden, they may find out exactly how capable they are.

Posted on: January 19, 2011 5:29 pm
Edited on: January 19, 2011 5:30 pm
 

Headset Reset: Welcome to the Pac-12 and Big Ten

Posted by Adam Jacobi

"Headset Reset " is the College Football Blog's series reviewing the 22 new head coaches in the FBS and what they'll need to accomplish in their new jobs to succeed. In this edition: the four new head coaches in the Pac-12 and Big Ten.

DAVID SHAW, Stanford

Why him? Shaw represents a reaffirmation of the Jim Harbaugh regime, which rose from doormat to Pac-10 power with Shaw as offensive coordinator. Stanford AD Bob Bowlsby didn't get Boise State head coach Chris Petersen during negotiations after Harbaugh's departure, but Bowlsby's bona fides in football coach hiring are pretty solid. By hiring Shaw (and interviewing two other in-house candidates), Stanford has told its fans, "it ain't broke, and we're not fixin'."  By 2014, Shaw will need to: perpetuate Stanford's recent successes. Harbaugh isn't the first coach to win at Stanford, and he's also not the first coach to bolt for greener pastures at the first opportunity. So being that Stanford's main opposition in the Pac-12 North is Oregon and four programs with a light history of success (and let's ignore Stanford's time in that role since 40 years ago), there's an opportunity for the Cardinal to assert some authority.  Chances Shaw gets what he needs? Pretty good. Stanford's athletic department has a surprising amount of money, and with Oregon and Nike trying to start an arms race with the rest of the Pac-12, Stanford is one of the few schools that can probably keep up -- as long as it still wants to, anyway.

JON EMBREE, Colorado

Why him? Well, let's just not ask Bill McCartney that question. Past that, Embree was hired because he's a former Buffalo, and it would take a Colorado man to take this job and not flee the first time the Buffaloes put together seven wins in a season. By 2014, Embree will need to: get his team competitive with USC -- or whoever else is atop the Pac-12 South. There's no indication that Colorado's better or even as good as the rest of the division it's entering. CU can thank Dan Hawkins in some respects for that, but really, Colorado football hasn't been relevant for almost 15 years (yes, CU went to two consecutive Big XII Championships ... and lost them by a hilarious combined score of 112-6). Continued sub-mediocrity won't fly, especially as the Buffaloes try to acclimate themselves to a new conference without the strong tradition of success the Big XII had. Chances Embree gets what he needs? Not great. Colorado has struggled with keeping its football program relevant ever since the shared title year of 1990, even with some apparently decent head coaching hires. The move from the Big XII North to the Pac-12 South won't help lighten the Buffaloes' burden any, either. Colorado's struggles could very well be an institutional problem, not a coaching problem, and if that's the case it's probably easy to see how the Jon Embree Era will end in Boulder.

KEVIN WILSON, Indiana

Why him? This might actually be the most surprising hire of 2010, mainly because we didn't know Indiana could do something like this. The Hoosiers tabbed the vaunted Oklahoma offensive coordinator for his first head coaching gig, and they briefly had Boise State WR coach Brent Pease as the offensive coordinator. Hello, points! Problem was, Boise State's OC position opened up, and Pease went back to Boise for that gig, as would most sane coaches. This is still Indiana we're talking about. By 2014, Wilson will need to: prove that his offensive genius wasn't just "hand the ball to Adrian Peterson or DeMarco Murray and watch what happens." It likely wasn't, of course; Texas ably demonstrated this year that there's no such thing as a team too talented to get run into the ground by mediocre coaching. But still, the question remains; what's Wilson going to do when week in and week out, his players are inferior to their opponents? Chances Wilson gets what he needs? The better question here is whether Indiana gets what it needs, which is a solid football program led by a solid coach. That seems unlikely. Either Wilson fails badly in Bloomington like pretty much everyone before him, or he actually puts together a winning season, and starts getting wooed by job offers. What's going to keep Wilson in town when that starts happening? He doesn't have any prior connection to Indiana (both the school and the state itself), and his salary is only ("only") $1.2 million. As soon as he wins six games in a season up there, he's getting phone calls.

BRADY HOKE, Michigan

Why him? Michigan went back to its roots by hiring a former assistant, effectively admitting that the Rich Rodriguez dalliance was a mistake (also conveying that message: firing Rich Rodriguez) and that there was a formula to be followed. Hoke has whipped two programs into shape in short order, and he'll need to do it again at Michigan, which is just a mess. By 2014, Hoke will need to: have Michigan reloading instead of rebuilding. Michigan's biggest challengers in its new division are Nebraska and maybe Iowa or Northwestern. Hoke has no excuses for not routinely making the conference championship (or if not, being just a game out). Beating Ohio State would also be strongly recommended. Chances Hoke gets what he needs? Pretty darn good. Michigan has the resources, tradition, and expectations to get at least 10 wins a year, and now it's got a coach that can make that happen too. The common theme about the Hoke hire was that it wasn't "sexy," which means he's literally not an attractive person and/or that his teams play defense. Neither fact is a valid reason not to like this hire. Hoke wasn't Michigan's first choice, but neither was Jim Tressel at OSU. That's not to say "hiring fifth choice = national championship" is a valid strategy, but it's just extremely unlikely that there's only one right choice at a school with the inherent advantages that Michigan or any other traditional college football power would have. Jim Harbaugh probably would have succeeded at Michigan. So might Hoke. So might a cardboard cutout of Bo Schembechler (which is what the older part of Michigan's fanbase really wants in its heart of hearts anyway).

JERRY KILL, Minnesota

Why him? Aside from the obvious--that his name is literally just "Kill"--Minnesota hired a guy with 200 games of head coaching experience and a 63.5% winning percentage, all before his 50th birthday. Kill has succeeded in the MAC, where success is fleeting at best, and at a Southern Illinois program that wasn't really in good shape when he arrived. The track record's there, in other words. By 2014, Kill will need to: keep the stadium full. Minnesota's TCF Bank Stadium is the newest house on the block in the Big Ten, but it's not exactly the biggest -- more like the opposite of that word. The luster of the new stadium was already wearing off by the time Tim Brewster was fired, as the team struggled to fill the stadium or do anything else of merit.  Chances Kill gets what he needs? Well, this depends solely on Kill's recruiting ability. He's been a head coach for almost 20 years, all of which came in the Midwest, so he knows the drill, and he knows the coaches. He just hasn't tried to land any big names before, and while bringing big names to Minnesota seems like a challenge, both Brewster and Glen Mason did it every now and then. So there's a chance he makes a turnaround happen.


 
 
 
 
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