Tag:Georgetown
Posted on: May 24, 2011 9:40 am
 

Calhoun predicts Big East split in 4-5 years

By Brett McMurphy, CBSSports.com Senior Writer

PONTA VERDA BEACH, Fla. – UConn basketball coach Jim Calhoun admits he likely won’t be coaching when it happens, but he still sees it coming. And it can’t be stopped.

Rapture? The end of the world? Not quite, but the end of the Big East Conference as we know it now.

“My own personal opinion – and I won't probably see this – in the next couple of years, four or five years down the road, I think you'll see a separation [of the football and non-football membership],” Calhoun said. “I think it's inevitable.”

The Big East currently has 16 members, including eight football members. Next season with the addition of TCU, that number inflates to 17 all-sport members and nine football members.

That number could increase even more in the next couple of years with the Big East looking to expand its football membership by as many as three teams, which conceivably could result in a behemoth 20 member conference, including 12 football members.

Big East commissioner John Marinatto has said the Big East’s 16-team basketball league could evolve into 20-teams, split into four pods of five teams or two 10-team divisions.

“If you go to 18 [members], oh boy,” Calhoun said. “We're talking about going to 17 [now and that] creates enough different issues.”

A split of the football and non-football schools has been speculated for some time, but league sources feel that would happen as only a last resort.

Calhoun, 68, said if the league split, the eight basketball members – DePaul, Georgetown, Marquette, Notre Dame, Providence, Seton Hall, St. John’s and Villanova – would pursue some additional teams from the Atlantic 10, such as Xavier and Dayton.

“That’s what I think could happen,” Calhoun said.

Posted on: February 17, 2011 11:35 pm
Edited on: February 17, 2011 11:35 pm
 

Mark Cuban's quest for a playoff continues

Posted by Tom Fornelli

In December Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban let it be known that he wanted to help implement a playoff system in college football, and it turns out that these were not just empty words. Since announcing his intentions last December, Cuban has been taking steps to make his vision a reality, including starting a new company with the sole purpose of bringing a playoff to the college game.
The billionaire entrepreneur has formed a limited liability company called Radical Football “to impact college football so that the last two teams playing are the best two teams,” Cuban said in an e-mail.
Radical Football was registered in Texas on Dec. 28 and already has at least one person working for it:Brett Morris, 40, a Los Angeles-based digital media consultant. Morris previously served as president of a national marketing agency focused on sporting goods and has worked in the Notre Dame athletics department as promotions coordinator.
When asked why he felt the need to start an LLC to get this done, Cuban said "because that is what the lawyers told us we should do. I pay, I listen."

Essentially, what Radical Football is doing is figuring out a way to create a playoff system that would appeal to both the fans, and to the schools. There have been contests amongst business students at schools all over the world as they attempt to create such a system. For instance, the winning team from a group of students at Oxford will be meeting with Cuban to discuss their ideas later this year.

The list of schools being used in the company's research include USC, Notre Dame, Texas, San Diego State, Florida, Georgetown, Duke, UCLA and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Of course, coming up with a good idea will only be half the battle. Finding a way to convince the powers that be in college football to adopt the playoff system will be the biggest challenge.

Even if Cuban's company can come up with a great idea that makes more money for everybody, there's no guarantee that the BCS or NCAA will listen. After all, they've been presented with plenty of ideas in the past, but don't seem all that interested in change. For the most part they say their concern isn't as much making more money as it is preserving the tradition of the bowl games and the importance of the regular season.
 
 
 
 
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